Know by Video

video

Public Awareness Videos

Viduli Mahaththaya is a Cartoon character who teaches in simple language to a layman how various components of an electrical power system is designed and operated. In the first of this series, he teaches you how an electrical power system is operated. In the second episode, he teaches how our domestic electrical system works.

Viduli Mahaththaya I

How the Sri Lankan Power System is Controlled.

Viduli Mahaththaya I I

All you should know about your household electrical network.

Know about Hydro power plants

book with colorized drawing city

Laxapana Complex can be described as Kehelgamu – Maskeli Oya complex, As the five power stations in the Laxapana Complex are situated along Kehelgamu oya and Maskeli Oya.

Laxapana Complex

hppo_laxapana

Laxapana Complex can be described as Kehelgamu – Maskeli Oya complex, as the five power stations in the Laxapana Complex are situated along Kehelgamu oya and Maskeli Oya. The main large reservoir at the top of Kehelgamu oya is Castlereagh reservoir, where the rain water from the catchment area above the reservoir gets collected. Main reservoir associated with Maskeli oya is Maussakelle reservoir.

Water collected in the Castlereagh reservoir is brought down along a power tunnel to Wimalasurendra power station to operate the two hydro turbine-generators, each 25 MW in capacity. Water released from Wimalasurendra power plants after operation, gets collected in Norton pond, which is not a large reservoir. This water is brought down along another tunnel to Old Laxapana power station to operate five turbine-generator units, where 03 units are of 8.33 MW and other two units of 12.5 MW. Water released after operations of Old Laxapana machines gets collected in Laxapana pond.

Similarly. Water collected in Maussakelle reservoir is taken along a tunnel to operate the two Canyon machines of 30 MW each. Water discharged after operations gets collected in Canyon pond. This water is brought down along another tunnel to operate the two New Laxapana machines which are 50 MW each. These two machines release the water to Laxapana pond as Old Laxapana machines.

Water collected in Laxapana pond is taken along a tunnel to operate the two machines, which are 37.5 MW each, at Samanala power station at Polpitiya. Water released from Samanala machines flow into the Kelani river, which forms by Kehelgamu oya and Maskeli oya.

Mahaweli Complex

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The first reservoir in Mahaweli complex is the Kotmale reservoir. Water is taken to operate the three turbine –generator units (each of 67 MW) at Kotmale power station. Water released after operations flows along the river into the Polgolla barrage, which is a small pond. From Polgolla barrage, water is diverted to North Central province for irrigation and other purposes. This is done by carrying the water through a long tunnel to Ukuwela power station to operate two 20 MW machines. Water released after operating these 02 units flow to Bowatenna reservoir. Water is sent to Anuradhapura district direct from Bowatenna reservoir, and water used to operate the 40 MW machine at Bowatenna power station is sent to Elahera anicut, again to distribute for irrigation.

When water spills over the Polgolla barrage, during rainy seasons, it flows along the Mahaweli river to the large Victoria reservoir. The three 70 MW hydro units at Victoria power station operates using water from Victoria reservoir. Water released after operations at Victoria power station flows to Randenigala reservoir, which is the largest reservoir in Mahaweli complex. Water at Randenigala reservoir is used to operate the two 60 MW machines at Randenigala power station and then released to Rantambe reservoir. Though said a reservoir, it is also a small pond which can be regulated. Water at Rantambe pond is taken to operate the two machines at Rantambe power station, which are of 25 MW capacity each. The discharged water from Rantambe power station is sent to Minipe anicut. This water is then distributed to right and left banks of Minipe canals to use for downstream irrigation and other purposes.

The primary objective of the Mahaweli system is to provide water to irrigation and other usages. Power generation is the secondary purpose. Ceylon Electricity Board and Water Management Secretariat of Mahaweli Authority of Sri Lanka jointly decides the water utilisation of these reservoirs, in a manner which both parties benefit, ultimately giving the maximum benefit to the country.

Visit Mahaweli complex.lk for more details

Know about Electricity Power Management

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Demand Side Management

DSM encompasses “systematic utility and government activities designed to change the amount and/or timing of the customer’s use of electricity” for the collective benefit of the society, the utility and its customers. As such, it is an umbrella term that includes several different load shape objectives, including load management (LM), energy efficiency (EE) and electrification.

DSM Objectives

DSM objectives are normally categorised into Corporate, Load Shape and Non-Load Shape objectives and are described below.

Corporate Objectives

In order for the CEB to achieve its Mission it has set operational and management objectives. This would include improving power quality and reliability, minimizing pilferage, reducing system losses, improving the distribution network, upgrading sub-stations, high collection efficiency, improving customer service etc.

Load Shape Objectives

Inevitably, as DSM is being considered primarily as a cost-effective alternative to supply-side options, the extent to which a given DSM program meets the CEB’s load shape objectives is of paramount consideration. Like supply-side options, DSM options generally primarily address one of the following specific load shape objectives

dsm_loadshape
Peak Clipping the reduction of utility load primarily during periods of peak demand
Valley-Filling the improvement of system load factor by building load in off-peak periods
Load Shifting the reduction of utility loads during periods of peak demand, while at the same time building load in
off-peak periods. Load shifting typically does not substantially alter total electricity sales.
Conservation the reduction of utility loads, more or less equally, during all or most hours of the day
Load Building the increase of utility loads, more or less equally, during all or most hours of the day
provision of a more
Flexible Utility Load Shape refers to programs that set up utility options to alter customer energy consumption on an as-needed basis,as in interruptible / curtailable agreements

Know about Power sources

Alternative_Energies
What is Renewable Energy?

Renewable energy is energy which comes from natural resources such as sunlight, wind, rain, biomass tides, and geothermal heat, which are renewable (naturally replenished). About 16% of global final energy consumption comes from renewables, with 10% coming from traditional biomass, which is mainly used for heating, and 3.4% from hydroelectricity. New renewables (small hydro, modern biomass, wind, solar, geothermal, and biofuels) accounted for another 2.8% and are growing very rapidly.[1] The share of renewables in electricity generation is around 19%, with 16% of global electricity coming from hydroelectricity and 3% from new renewables.

Hydropower

Energy in water can be harnessed and used. Since water is about 800 times denser than air, even a slow flowing stream of water, or moderate sea swell, can yield considerable amounts of energy. There are many forms of water energy

  • Hydroelectric energy is a term usually reserved for large-scale hydroelectric dams
  • Micro hydro systems are hydroelectric power installations that typically produce up to 100 kW of power.They are often used in water rich areas as a remote-area power supply
  • Run-of-the-river hydroelectricity systems derive kinetic energy from rivers and oceans without using a dam.

Wind Power

Airflows can be used to run wind turbines. Modern wind turbines range from around 600 kW to 5 MW of rated power, although turbines with rated output of 1.5–3 MW have become the most common for commercial use; the power output of a turbine is a function of the cube of the wind speed, so as wind speed increases, power output increases dramatically.[22] Areas where winds are stronger and more constant, such as offshore and high altitude sites, are preferred locations for wind farms. Typical capacity factors are 20-40%, with values at the upper end of the range in particularly favourable sites.

Solar Energy

Solar energy is the energy derived from the sun through the form of solar radiation. Solar powered electrical generation relies on photovoltaics and heat engines. A partial list of other solar applications includes space heating and cooling through solar architecture, daylighting, solar hot water, solar cooking, and high temperature process heat for industrial purposes.

Biomass

Biomass (plant material) is a renewable energy source because the energy it contains comes from the sun. Through the process of photosynthesis, plants capture the sun’s energy. When the plants are burnt, they release the sun’s energy they contain. In this way, biomass functions as a sort of natural battery for storing solar energy.

Sri Lankan Scenario

Sri Lanka is blessed with the renewable energy sources which can be utilized to fulfill energy requirements of the country. Ceylon Electricity Board as a power utility of the country has promoted generation of electricity using Renewable Energy Resources since early nineties by giving the required assistance to the private sector, which includes training & capacity building, pre feasibility studies and resource assessments.

The procedure for electricity purchases from small renewable energy producers (SPPs) by the CEB was regularized beginning 1997 with the publication of a standardized power purchase agreement (SPPA) which included a scheme for calculating the purchase price based on the avoided cost principle. This was offered to all sources of power plants of capacity less than 10 MW.

Moreover the government has identified the development of Renewable Energy Projects, as a matter of policy to diversify the electricity sector from high cost thermal power generation. Therefore, required incentives and assistance was provided for the renewable energy resource development (Mini Hydro, Bio Mass, Wind, etc.,). Further National Energy Policy 2006 has identified fuel diversify and energy security in electricity generation as a strategic objective and development of renewable energy projects was identified as a part of this strategy. In view of above action has been taken to introduce a cost based, technology specific, three-tier tariff instead of avoided cost based tariff with effect from year 2007.

For more details on renewable energy development in Sri Lanka please click on opportunity for renewable energy development

Latest Status of Non-Conventional Renewable Energy Sector

Domestic and Religious Purpose Tariffs

The present electricity tariff for Domestic and Religious Premises customers is such that the charge for electricity depends not only on the number of units (kWh) consumed but also on the rate of consumption. In other words, charge for a number of units consumed over a period of 10 days will be higher than the charge for the same number of units if consumed over a period of 20 days. That is why the tariff is having blocks of units with different unit rates.

The present tariff has energy unit blocks of 30, 60, 90, 120 and so on. These are defined for a 30-day billing period. This means that the first block of 30 units will become 28 units or 32 units if the meter readings are taken in 28 days or 32 days respectively. Other blocks will also change similarly. So, if you have consumed 30 units in 28 days, then 28 units are billed at the first block rate (lowest rate) and the balance 2 units are billed at the second block rate (higher rate) whereas, if you have consumed 30 units in 30 days or longer, all 30 units will be billed at the first block (lowest) rate.

Following are some examples how your bill is computed

Domestic Purpose Tariff

Consumption of 210 units in 31 days

Since the billing period is 31 days, the applicable blocks will be 0-31, 32-62, 63-93, 94-124, 125-186 and 187 and above.

Units Price Energy charge Total
The charge for first 62 units (up to 62 units) 62 x 7.85 486.70 486.70
The charge for next 31 units (up to 93 units) 31 x 10.00 310.00 310.00
The charge for next 31 units (up to 124 units) 31 x 27.75 860.25 860.25
The charge for next 62 units (up to 186 units) 62 x 32.00 1984.00 1984.00
The charge for remaining 24 units (up to 210 units) 24 x 45.00 1080.00 1080.00
Fixed charge (above 186 units) 540.00
Total Charge 4720.95 5260.95

Religious Purpose Tariff

consumption of 250 units in 28 days
Since the billing period is 28 days, the applicable blocks will be 0-28, 29-84, 85-112, 113-168 and 169 and above.

Units Price Rs
The charge for first 28 units = 28 x 1.90 = 53.20
The charge for next 56 units (up to 84 units) = 56 x 2.80 = 156.80
The charge for next 28 units (up to 112 units) = 28 x 6.75 = 189.00
The charge for next 56 units (up to 168 units) = 56 x 7.50 = 420.00
The charge for remaining 82 units (up to 250 units) = 82 x 9.40 = 770.80
Fixed charge (above 168 units) = 240.00
Total charge = 1,829.80

Industrial Purpose and General Purpose Tariffs

For tariff category G-1 as well as I-1, a separate sub category has been created for those who consume less than 300 kWh (units) per month (30 day billing cycle) and the bill will be calculated using volume differentiated tariff structure. However, for all other categories, tariffs have flat rates for units consumed and thus the energy charges for a same number of units do not vary with rate of consumption. The tariffs for Industrial Purpose and General Purpose customers with electricity demand of over 42kVA have different kWh rates for Time of Use (ToU). In addition to the energy charge and the fixed charge, a demand charge is also applicable.

Hotel Purpose Tariffs

These tariffs have flat rates for units consumed and thus the energy charges for a same number of units do not vary with rate of consumption. However, customers with electricity demand of over 42kVA have different kWh rates for Time of Use (ToU) and, in addition to the energy charge and the fixed charge, a demand charge is also applicable.

Following are some examples how your bill is computed

Industrial Purpose I-1

Consumption of 250 units in 29 days

Units Price Energy charge Total
The Charge For 250 Units 250 x 10.80 2700.00 2700.00
Fixed charge 600.00
Total charge 3300.00

Consumption of 450 units in 31 days

Units Price Energy charge Total
The Charge For 450 Units 450 x 12.20 5490.00 5490.00
Fixed charge 600.00
Total charge 6090.00

General Purpose G-1

Consumption of 290 units in 30 days

Units Price Energy charge Total
The Charge For 290 Units 290 x 18.30 5307.00 5307.00
Fixed charge 240.00
Total charge 5547.00

Consumption of 450 units in 31 days

Units Price Energy charge Total
The Charge For 450 Units 450 x 22.85 10282.50 10282.50
Fixed charge 240.00
Total charge 10522.50

Hotels H-1

Consumption of 450 units in 31 days

Units Price Energy charge Total
The Charge For 450 Units 450 x 21.50 9675.00 9675.00
Fixed charge 600.00
Total charge 10275.00

Industrial Purpose I – 3

Consumption of Peak -14,500 units, Day -19,000 units and Off Peak – 11,600 units in 31 days with 105 kVA maximum demand

Units Price Charge Total
The charge for 14,500 units at peak 14,500 x 23.50 340,750.00
The charge for 19,000 units at day time 19,000 x 10.25 194,750.00
The charge for 11,600 units at off-peak 11,600 x 5.90 68,440.00
Total KWH Charge
Demand charge
105 x 1000.00 105,000.00 603,940.00
105,000.00
Fixed charge 3,000.00
Total charge 711,940.00

——————————————————————————–

Similarly your bill will be computed for other categories(H-2, G-2, I-2, H-3, G-3) as well

Street Lighting

There shall be two types of street lighting customers, public and private:

(a) Street lighting for public use, where the street lights are fixed along public roads, and where the road belongs to or is maintained by a Local Authority or a Provincial Authority or the Road Development Authority, and where the road users do not pay a fee for the use of such roadways and have unhindered access

(b) Street lighting for private use along roadways belonging to any individual or institution other than the Authorities listed in (a) above. Roadways in which ownership is not specifically defined and any other premises other than a roadway belonging to the authorities listed in (a) including areas designated for recreation (such as parks including roads leading to such parks) or other services (such as offices and depots, and roads leading to such offices and depots), shall be considered as private.

Street lighting for public use shall continue to be metered, invoiced at the rate of Rs. 17.00 kWh (rate applicable for both public and private use of street lighting), and approved by the relevant Local, Provincial or Road authority.

Does delays in visiting to get meter reading results a higher charge?

There is a misconceived idea among Domestic Consumers that due to delays in taking the meter readings, consumers may be called upon to meet higher charges. How the monthly Electricity Bill of a Domestic Consumer is prepared is explained below.

n this connection, it is emphasized that the consumer is no way penalized by the date of arrival of the Meter Reader.

The concept adopted for this purpose is that on account of each day the Meter Reader is delayed (or is early) the limit for kWh in each tariff category is pro-rated on the basis of the number of days between the arrivals of the Meter Reader. For example, if the period between two meter readings is 35 days, the limit of the first block would be increased from 30 to 35 kWh, the limit for second block would be increased from 60 to 70 kWh and so forth.

These computations are made in advance and furnished to the meter readers in the form of a ready reckoner, and thereby the correct charge depending on the interval between the visits and the units consumed is readily available to the meter reader. The entries made by the meter reader would be subject to verification at the time of data entry, and any error would be automatically corrected in the next bill.

The consumers could verify their bills by using the Bill Calculator provided in CEB corporate web site.

Know about Frequently ask questions

wttw_support-faq

Frequently Ask Questions

From which Power Station do I Get My Electricity ?

It is not possible to answer this question, even if you are located exactly next door to a Power Station. It is similar to taking a bucket of water from the sea near an estuary and thinking from which river it has come.

All Power Stations generate and feed the power to an interconnected mesh like structure we referred to as a power Grid. Theses interconnections in the power Grid (and thus the name) are made out of High Voltage (220kilo Volts or 132 kilo Volts in Sri Lanka) Transmission Lines. They connect each and every power station in the country. The tall Steel Tower lines that you see on your wayside when you travel are these interconnections. At certain places within this Grid, there are Nodes we referred to as Grid Substations. They take power in the Power Grid, convert it to a lower voltage that you can use and distribute to your households. This transformation from a High Voltage to a Lower Voltage too takes place in a number of steps. Thus, as all Grid Connected power Stations are interconnected with each other, it is not possible to pin point exactly from which Power Station you have got your electricity. However, as in the example of taking a bucket of water from the sea near a river estuary, if you are near a power plant, we can say that a major portion of the power flow to your household could be from the closest power plant.

How does Islandwide Power Failures Occur ?

As we know from our fundamental Science, Electricity is a form of Energy. Thus, it can neither be created nor destroyed. Further, Electricity in Alternating Current form ( AC in short) cannot be stored. Thus, whenever consumers demand certain Energy within certain time duration, we have to generate in real time and provide that energy. In other words, the supply and demand of electrical energy must be the same in real time.

This balancing act is done by taking the Frequency of your Power supply (50 Hz in Sri Lanka) as a guide. For example, when consumers like you demand that they be supplied with 1000MJ (Mega Joules) of energy within any one second time slot, (1000MJ of Energy in one second is equal to 1000MW of Power), CEB has to provide exactly 1000MW. When we supply exactly the demand the frequency of supply will be stable (usually at the rated 50Hz). If our supply is less than your demand, the frequency will fall below 50Hz and if we supply more, the same will increase above 50Hz.

However, during certain emergencies, our power plants can get tripped (disconnected or automatically switched off). When a large power station (say 100MW) gets tripped in this manner, this supply- demand balancing act gets disturbed. Now, the consumers are demanding 1000MW but the supply is only for 900MW. As a result, the frequency of the power supply starts to drop. (Why and how it happens and who maintains the supply-demand balance during that time is beyond this simple answer.)The Engineers who are Operating the Power System has to act quickly and resupply the shortage. However, this takes some time. Until the supply-demand balance is restored, the frequency starts to fall below 50Hz.

It is not healthy for power plants to operate below a certain frequency. For example, most of the present Grid Connected Power Plants in our system cannot operate below 47Hz. Thus, if the low frequency situation is allowed to persist, after a certain time, the remaining power plants too start to get switched off thus aggravating the power shortage further. This could escalate in to a total cascaded failure.

However, all power plant trippings do not end up as Total Failures as there are certain automatic as well as manual corrective measures to restore the supply-demand balance following a disturbance.

Why does CEB requests us to save electricity during peak hours? Doesnt a Unit Saved is Unit Saved Irrespective of the Time of the Day ?

A unit of electricity saved during the peak times has a higher saving potential than during other times. As described in the answer to FAQ2, CEB has to supply the exact electrical power demand of consumers – 24×7. During the midnight and early in the morning, the power demand from the consumers is very low. Around 0200 am in the morning, it can fall to its lowest value within a day. During the day time, it is somewhat higher and at about 7pm in the night, the demand reaches a maximum. The latter is what we call the Night Peak.

The CEB has to follow the power demand in the country by varying its generation too accordingly, matching consumer demand MW to MW. During the early morning and the day time, CEB has lot of generating options as the demand is much lower than the combined generating capability called the installed capacity of the CEB. Thus, the CEB can afford to generate from the cheapest sources without resorting to expensive ones. CEB start generation from the cheaper plants first and go on adding more and more expensive generation as the demand goes up. This is called Merit Order Dispatch. When the demand drops, the reverse activity takes place and the CEB reduces generation starting from the most expensive.

During the Night Peak, CEB is running almost all its generators, including the very expensive Gas Turbine Units. The cost of generating a unit from a Gas Turbine can be as much as 10 times that of generating a unit from a Coal Power plant. Thus, when you switch off a bulb during the Night Time, CEB reduces their generation too from the most expensive power plant that is generating at the time. As a result, at Night time, a unit saved by you saves more money to the country than during rest of the time.

There is another reason why the CEB asks you to avoid the night peak. The generators that the CEB uses to provide the Peak demand called the peaking units are operated only for a few hours of the day. They remain shutdown during the rest of the time. Thus, it is in a way idling investment. If consumers help the CEB by curtailing the electricity use during the Night Peak, it not only helps the CEB to stop generation from an expensive plant. That may even help them to avoid the investment of a complete peaking unit in the future.

What is the Difference Between a kW and a kWh ?

We measure Electrical Energy using kWh. kWh stands for a kilo Watt Hour. Like Joules (J) or Horse Power (HP), kWh is a unit of measuring Energy. Watts is the unit of measuring Power. A kilo Watt is 1000 Watts and a kilo Watt hour is 1000 Watt Hours.

The difference between Energy and Power can be understood by the following analogy.

Imagine a water tank containing 1000 Liters of water. You have a large tap which can vary its flow. When you fully open the tap, you get water at a higher RATE. (say 1Litre every second). The VOLUME of water stored in the tank (in Liters) is analogues to Energy (in kWh). The rate at which water is drawn from the tank (Liters per second) is analogues to Power (kW). When we draw one kW of power for one hour we have actually consumed one kWh of energy.

If we have a larger capacity tap (or a power plant), we can provide more water (or electricity) to more consumers at the same time. However, what they actually consume is the number of Liters of water (or kWh of electricity). The water flow rate (or power) will decide how fast they consume or the rate at which they consume in Liters for every second (or kW).

Does Delays in Taking Meter Reading Result Higher Charges ?

There is a common misconception among Domestic Consumers that due to delays in taking the meter readings, consumers are unfairly penalized and are compelled to pay a higher charge than normal as their consumption extends to next higher block. This is incorrect as explained below.
A meter reader is normally expected to visit a premise in 30 day cycles. That is why each Tariff block has 30 units. However, it is not practically possible for the meter reader to always visit in 30 days. Thus, to account for each day the Meter Reader is delayed or is early the block size in each tariff category is prorated on the basis of the number of days between the arrival of the Meter Reader. For example, if the period between two meter readings is 35 days, the limit of the first block would be increased from 30 to 35 kWh, the limit for second block would be increased from 60 to 70 kWh and so forth. This will account for any disadvantage the consumer would have in the increasing block tariff structure.
These computations are made in advance and furnished to the meter readers in the form of a Ready Reckoner, and thereby the correct charge depending on the interval between the visits and the units consumed is readily available to the meter reader. The entries made by the meter reader would be subject to verification at the time of data entry, and any error would be automatically corrected in the next bill.
The consumers could verify their bills by using the Bill Calculator provided in CEB corporate web site.

Know about Transmission Network

Total Installed Capacity (CEB Hydro Power) 1377.0 MW
Total Installed Capacity (CEB Thermal Power) 1466.7 MW
Total Installed Capacity (CEB Wind Power) 3 MW
Number of Hydro Power Stations(CEB) 17
Number of Thermal Power Stations(CEB) 7
Number of 220kV Grid Substations 8
Number of 132 kV Grid Substations 55
Total length of 220 kV transmission lines  601 route length-km
Total length of 132kV transmission lines 2260 route length-km
Total length of 132kV UG Cables 50 km

Transmission Network

map

Our Grid Network

Name of the Generating Plant Location Generation Capacity Commercial Operation
Units (MW) Date
New Laxapana Laxapana 1 57.60 Feb/ Mar 1974

(Rehabilitated in 2014)

2 57.60 Feb/ Mar 1974

(Rehabilitated in 2014)

Old Laxapana Laxapana 1 9.5 December 1950

(Rehabilitated in 2014)

2 9.5 December 1950

(Rehabilitated in 2014)

3 9.5 December 1950

(Rehabilitated in 2014)

4 12.50 December 1958
5 12.50 December 1958
Wimalasurendra Norton Bridge 1 25.00 January 1965

(Rehabilitated in 2014)

2 25.00 January 1965

(Rehabilitated in 2014)

Polpitiya (Samanala) Pitawala 1 37.50 April 1969
2 37.50 April 1969
Canyon Maskeliya 1 30.00 March 1983
2 30.00 May 1988
sub total  353.70 MW
Name of the Generating Plant Location Generation Capacity Commercial Operation
Units (MW) Date
Kothmale Mawathura Gampola 1 67.00 April 1985
2 67.00 February 1988
3 67.00 February 1989
Victoria Hakurutale Adhikarigama 1 70.00 January 1985
2 70.00 October 1984
3 70.00 February 1986
Ukuwela Matale 1 20.00 July / August 1976

(Rehabilitated in 2011)

2 20.00 July / August 1976

(Rehabilitated in 2011)

Bowatenna Naula 1 40.00 June 1981
Randenigala Randenigala 1 61.00 July 1986
2 61.00 July 1986
Rantambe Rantambe 1 25.00 January 1990
2 25.00 January 1990
Nilambe Nilambe, Doluwa 1 03.00 July 1988
Upper Kothmale Niyamgamdora, Kothmale 1 75.00 March 2012
2 75.00 June 2012
sub total  816.00 MW

>

Name of the Generating Plant Location Generation Capacity Commercial Operation
Units (MW) Date
Samanala wewa Kapugala Balangoda 1 60.00 October 1992
2 60.00 October 1992
Kukule Molkawa 1 37.00 July 2003
2 37.00 July 2003
Udawalawe Udawalawe 1 06.00 April 1969
Inginiyagala Inginiyagala 1 11.00 June 1963
Wind Hambantota 1 03.00 1999
sub total  214.00 MW
Name of the Generating Plant Location Generation Capacity Commercial Operation
Units (MW) Date
KPS Gas Turbine Wellampitiya 1 20.00 November 1980
2 20.00 March 1981
3 20.00 April 1981
4 20.00 December 1981
5 20.00 April 1982
KPS Gas Turbine 7 Wellampitiya 1 115.00 August 1997
KCCP ( GT8 + ST ) Wellampitiya 1 165.00 August 2002
Sapugaskanda Diesel A Heiyanthuduwa 1 20.00 May 1984
2 20.00 May 1984
3 20.00 September 1984
4 20.00 October 1984
Sapugaskanda Diesl B Heiyanthuduwa 1 10.00 September 1997
2 10.00 September 1997
3 10.00 September 1997
4 10.00 September 1997
5 10.00 October 1999
6 10.00 October 1999
7 10.00 October 1999
8 10.00 October 1999
Puttalam Lakvijaya Coal Plant Narakkalliya, Norochcholai, Puttlam 1 300.00 July 2011
2 300.00 May 2014
3 300.00 October 2014
Uthuru Janani Chunnakam 1 8.9 Jan 2013
2 8.9 Jan 2013
3 8.9 Jan 2013
sub total  1467.70 MW

>

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Name of the Generating Plant Location Generation Capacity Commercial Operation
Units (MW) Date
Nainathivu Nainathivu 2 0.40 June 2001
Delft Delft 2 0.40 September 2001
Analaitheivu Analaitheivu 1 0.20 February 2009
Eluvaithievu Eluvaithievu 1 0.08 February 2009
Punguduthievu Punguduthievu 1 0.20 October 2007
Jaffna town Jaffana 1 0.50 August 1998
sub total  1.78 MW

Guidance to save your energy consumption

Save your money – Save the Green world